The name of the video really says it all. Texas-based yogi Adriene Mishler directs you through a series of poses that works the lower body and gets you one step closer to the elusive "yoga booty," all while clearly having a blast. She serves up the sequence with a side of goofiness—you’ll feel like you’re taking class with one of your funnier friends. And laughing totally counts as a workout, right? (via Yoga with Adriene)
It’s best to clean your yoga mat at least once a week to prevent staining and buildup. Use water and gentle cleansers like lemon juice or dish soap, but avoid abrasive sponges. Wipe down excess moisture and let your mat dry away from direct sunlight or high temperatures, which can accelerate the breakdown of natural materials like rubber. When in doubt, check your mat manufacturer’s care guidelines.
When searching for free yoga resources, the video-sharing behemoth YouTube is a good place to start. But type “yoga” into YouTube’s search bar, and you get back more than eight million results. Many of these are one-off videos rather than easy-to-follow programs for beginners. There are, however, two free yoga programs that are worth checking out: Yoga for Dummies and Dr. Melissa West’s channel.
Experts say: "Kino's videos are great for beginners, and for experienced practitioners looking to refresh their knowledge. In the video above, MacGregor takes the time to discuss the importance of breath, sun salutations, and foundation postures. She also explains both the purpose and the benefits of each pose, all while moving through a simple and meditative flow." — Serena Tom, Yoga Teacher, Equinox

Crank Up Core Strength: an athletic, dynamic routine with some arm balances that will tire you out. I think it’s best suited for someone who is already in good shape but is trying out yoga for the first time. The flow requires two blocks, which can stabilize you in poses when one hand is on the ground or help improve overall alignment. Until I got a great set of cork blocks, I used big, heavy books instead.

A good yoga mat should walk the line between being squishy enough to take some of the pressure off your joints, while being dense enough to offer a stable foundation. Too-soft mats may be comfortable, but they’re difficult to hold a pose on — and while you can stand on a too-firm mat forever, you may end up hurting your joints. Beginners, pregnant yogis, and people with sensitive joints should consider thicker mats, which offer more support. Yogis who commute or travel a lot may prefer thinner mats that are easier to roll up and carry.
Start in warrior 2 pose: left foot is back and left leg is straight. Right knee is bent at a 90-degree angle directly over the ankle, and right toes are pointing forward. Chest and hips are squared to the left side. Left arm is reaching back and right arm is reaching forward, so that they are parallel to the mat in a “T” position with palms facing down. Engage your abs.
Start in mountain pose. Step your left foot back three to four feet and place it down at a 45-degree angle, so that your back left arch is in line with your right heel. Keep your chest and hips facing forward to the front of the mat. Bend your front knee to a 90-degree angle directly over the ankle, with your toes pointing forward. Don’t bend the knee past the ankle.

Challenging your muscle memory keeps your mind sharp! In this sequence, Health's contributing yoga editor Kristin McGee puts a new twist on the standard yoga flow, shaking up classic sequences so they feel brand-new. McGee says this routine is perfect for yogis of all skill levels. As a bonus, studies show that making your brain’s processing center work harder may help with long-term memory retention.
Feeling overwhelmed? Yoga can help you take a step back from your busy schedule and find balance. A stressed-out mind often means a tense body (think: a clenched jaw, a stiff neck), so a calming yoga flow can give you a sense of relief both inside and out. Clinical therapist and yoga instructor Lauren Taus leads the way in this short but restorative flow, which is designed to give you an opportunity slow down and de-stress.
About the channel: Adriene Mishler is one of the most-followed yoga teachers on YouTube, with more than 1.6 million subscribers. She offers tons of different kinds of specialized classes, like "Yoga For Anxiety" and "Yoga For Runners," plus more basic classes for all levels. Her videos don't have any students in them; they're just of her. The channel has new episodes every Wednesday.
I personally believe the Liforme Yoga Mat is the best yoga mat currently available. Though slightly thinner and lighter than its “Everyday Practice Mat” competitors, it still manages to be incredibly durable and supportive enough for knees and other bony joints. It feels great on the skin, stays grippy without clinging in wet or dry conditions and comes with helpful alignment markers to keep you balanced and strong.
It may be a bit of a late reply - I have a Manduka Eko and the Manduka towel. When I'm not that sweaty I find the mat itself is super grippy, but gets slippy when wet. But the towel is awesome, and gets stickier as I get sweatier! It's even been brilliant for the occasional hot yoga class - but mostly I just mean full on Fiji flow class sweaty :) Not the cheapest or lightest option, but really works for me. The towel can then also be easily washed, and, unlike some other towels I've tried, doesn't move or get twisted during practice.
Experts say: "Kino's videos are great for beginners, and for experienced practitioners looking to refresh their knowledge. In the video above, MacGregor takes the time to discuss the importance of breath, sun salutations, and foundation postures. She also explains both the purpose and the benefits of each pose, all while moving through a simple and meditative flow." — Serena Tom, Yoga Teacher, Equinox
Stressed out. Tense. Crazed. If any of these words describe you, this routine’s a godsend. You’ll gently sway and flow your way from forward folds to low lunges to splits (only if you’re up for them)—all in just 30 minutes. With breezy and serene direction, Tara Stiles gives more advanced options for those who want them, but she’s really all about finding what works best for your body in that moment. (via CosmoBody)
About the channel: Adriene Mishler is one of the most-followed yoga teachers on YouTube, with more than 1.6 million subscribers. She offers tons of different kinds of specialized classes, like "Yoga For Anxiety" and "Yoga For Runners," plus more basic classes for all levels. Her videos don't have any students in them; they're just of her. The channel has new episodes every Wednesday.
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About the channel: Gaiam is a lifestyle brand originally founded in Colorado that focuses on yoga, fitness, wellness, and the environment. As part of their brand, they have a YouTube channel where they offer classes by well-known yoga instructors, like Rodney Yee and Colleen Raidman. Most of the videos are of just teachers, though some of them have students in them, too.
On an inhale, raise your arms straight up above your head and bring your palms together. Bend your knees slightly, and on the exhale, hinge at your hips to fold forward, lengthening your spine the whole way down as you reach for the floor. Bring either your fingertips or palms to the floor, fingers in line with your toes. Slowly straighten your legs as much as you can without straining. Shift the weight toward your toes. Straighten your arms and lift your chest away from your thighs to make a flat back.
Instructor Amira Freidson told us that a standard-size yoga mat is 68 inches long — just long enough for someone who’s five-foot-eight. To make sure you’re not too cramped during practice, check to see if your whole body fits on the mat while lying down with your face towards the ceiling. While there are no benefits to using a too-small mat, extra-large mats may be good for working on your flexibility: Instructor Giovanna Abraham says, “For more experienced yogis who have been practicing for 2-5 years, a longer mat would definitely be helpful — for instance, in giving them greater space to extend deeper into their poses.”
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