Trying to achieve that state of total self-awareness and calmness of body and soul is very important to us at Free People, which is why we love yoga. From hot yoga, vinyasa flow to bikram, find your center while doing your favorite meditative activity in yoga clothes designed to support your practice. Our yoga wear is about being comfortable and totally chic. We incorporate a breathable and supportive performance fabric designed to move with you. It comes in different styles and colors, perfect for whatever piece of yoga clothing you are looking for. We love bringing together white or black yoga pants with colorful strappy bras or printed yoga leggings with stretchy racerback tanks that make getting through yoga classes a breeze.

We wanted to make sure our top picks would be easy to clean and durable (no mid-session mat shrapnel here!) We found that more porous, open-cell mat surfaces tended to be grippier, but were also harder to clean — they tend to absorb everything, like a giant sponge. Smooth, closed-cell surfaces tend to be easier to clean, but may be more slippery. The sweet spot is a mat that’s just grippy enough but doesn’t hold onto dirt and debris.
What it is: OneOEight is a subscription-based online yoga studio founded by the very well-known yogi Rachel Brathen (i.e. @yoga_girl on Instagram). OneOEight — which has tons of teachers, including Brathen — divides their classes by mood, duration, teacher, focus, destination, and style, which makes it really easy to choose the classes that work best for you. Plus, many of the classes — which range from group classes to classes with just a teacher — are filmed in soothing locations, like the beach or a plant-filled room, which helps set a calming tone from the beginning. And the platform also offers recipe and travel recommendations in addition to yoga and meditation.
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David is DoYogaWithMe's founder. After doing his first yoga class in his early twenties, he was driven to heal himself from successive injuries as an athlete and yearned to go deeper into his spiritual practice. Since then, David has explored many different styles of yoga, delved deep into the world of meditation and experimented with yoga breathing techniques. He is a yoga and meditation instructor, massage therapist, videographer, writer and dad and is known for his calm, skilled delivery, his ability to encourage people to be connected to their inner experience and his knowledge of anatomy, alignment, meditation, relaxation and pranayama.
I started feeling my left knee pop and my back ache at the base of my neck. With any new exercise, it’s normal to feel some new aches and pains while your muscles adjust. When you release tight muscles as you start doing yoga, it impacts your overall posture and muscles in unexpected places across your body, which might make you sore. Since I’m a desk worker, I wasn’t surprised that waking up neglected neck muscles was uncomfortable—they always get sore when I exercise my upper body, and the sensation was familiar.
The “grippiness” of a mat has two parts. One is how grippy the mat is against your hands and feet — are you slowly sliding out of place during warrior pose, or are you solidly planted? The other is the traction of the mat against the floor: Does your mat slip around on smooth floors, or is it firmly stuck in place throughout your session? Sweat can be a factor too, especially if you practice an intensive form like hot yoga, so you want to make sure your mat will stay grippy through it all.

Calling all newbies: You don’t have to head to a studio to learn the basics. Just follow along with Kino MacGregor in this video. In just 12 minutes, you’ll get the low-down on controlling the breath, sun salutations, and more. We love that MacGregor explains both the purpose and the benefits of each pose, all while moving through a simple yet strengthening flow. (via BeFit)
Experts say: "Initially, Dana used her Instagram account as a way for her to track her own progress. She quickly became popular on the platform because she frequently posts photos of herself contorting her body in complicated and advanced yoga postures. People love Dana because she promotes self-love and her poses are aspirational. She advocates that yoga is for EVERYBODY, that people of all ages, sizes and body types can have a regular yoga practice. Most of all, she is relatable, transparent, and authentic — which is why so many people connect with her." — Serena Tom, Yoga Teacher, Equinox

The leading yoga publication’s video section is a comprehensive resource with 360-degree views to better understand the nuances of every pose. The routines are more technical, more likely to use Sanskrit terms, and more athletically challenging than the ones I came across on DoYogaWithMe. My two main gripes with Yoga Journal’s online offerings: The videos were often shorter than I’d like (I find I need about an hour to get into a meditative, head-clearing state) and didn’t include any user reviews, so I found myself clicking around aimlessly in search of videos that would be a good fit. That being said, the production quality and detailed explanation of each pose is hard to beat when it comes to free yoga resources.

A good yoga mat should walk the line between being squishy enough to take some of the pressure off your joints, while being dense enough to offer a stable foundation. Too-soft mats may be comfortable, but they’re difficult to hold a pose on — and while you can stand on a too-firm mat forever, you may end up hurting your joints. Beginners, pregnant yogis, and people with sensitive joints should consider thicker mats, which offer more support. Yogis who commute or travel a lot may prefer thinner mats that are easier to roll up and carry.
What to Look for in Yoga Clothes: In the last decade yoga has taken over, and with it a large number of clothing and activewear brands who have found their niche in outfitting yogis of all different styles, shapes, and sizes. This is the reason we have decided to curate the best of those yoga apparel brands on one website. Now you can purchase your favorite strappy Onzie bras in that cool new print and those new Teeki Hot Pants you've had your eye on, all in one place. Both yoga apparel brands have some of the best yoga pants you will ever put on!  From the Vinyasa addict to the slow and steady Hatha practitioner, our yoga clothing and activewear brands will take you through your practice with fashion and function designed specifically for your style of practice. We take our yoga clothing and activewear seriously and don't carry brands that we wouldn't stand behind. Yogis who prefer more yang in their practice will find that supplex fabrics wick sweat away and stay in place as they flow throughout their practice. Hot Yogis who turn up the tapas will want ultra breathable fabrics that dry quickly like Recycled PET and Lyrca. 
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