Yoga for Dummies is a six-part series of 10-minute videos. Put them together, and you’ve got a great starter yoga class that eases you into your practice. West’s channel has dozens of videos to choose from. I’d recommend starting with her beginner playlist, especially Namaste Episode 101. The 11 videos on the playlist are some of the best explanations of poses that I’ve come across. And West’s personable nature will keep you coming back.
We’ve selected yoga videos for some of the most common poses you’ll encounter in a yoga class. Each pose has an English name and a Sanskrit name—in these videos you may hear just one name, or both. The first nine poses collectively comprise the yoga sequence Sun Salutation A, which is a set sequence of postures often found at the beginning of a yoga class intended to warm up the body.
On an inhale, raise your arms straight up above your head and bring your palms together. Bend your knees slightly, and on the exhale, hinge at your hips to fold forward, lengthening your spine the whole way down as you reach for the floor. Bring either your fingertips or palms to the floor, fingers in line with your toes. Slowly straighten your legs as much as you can without straining. Shift the weight toward your toes. Straighten your arms and lift your chest away from your thighs to make a flat back.

Begin in mountain pose with your hands on your hips. Step your left foot back about three feet and place it down at a 45-degree angle, so that your left arch is in line with your right heel. Your right toes should be pointing to the front of the mat. Both legs are straight. Turn your chest to face the left side. Reach your right out in front of your body and your left arm out behind you, so that they are parallel to the mat in a “T” position with your palms facing down.
The Liforme Yoga Mat rolled out with a quietly satisfying plop and seemed firmly set in the ground, ready for action. We never had to worry about the mat sliding around on the floor or about sliding around on top of it ourselves. The Liforme mat has a natural, grippy rubber base and smooth, matte polyurethane top. It’s not so sticky it catches you while you’re trying to switch positions (like the Hugger Mugger Para Rubber did), but was grippy enough to keep us stable even during hot yoga sessions. One tester noted, “The sweater I got, the stickier the mat was.”
… However, I was immediately skeptical of the opacity of a marketing phrase “non-Amazon rubber” which usually means Indonesian and Malaysian rubber. There is a significant problem of illegal logging, slash and burn clearing of primary rainforests, besides the 'usual' associated losses of flora and fauna, it results in a hazardous seasonal haze that covers much of lower Southeast Asia. A topic that deserves more turning over.
Answer: Of course! With our yoga for seniors videos, I didn’t have a single person request a refund. But, if you really don’t like the videos, just send an email to info (at) sixtyandme.com within 7 days of purchase and I will give you a full refund. Yoga for seniors DVD customers must return the product to receive a refund excluding shipping and handling fees.
A good yoga mat should walk the line between being squishy enough to take some of the pressure off your joints, while being dense enough to offer a stable foundation. Too-soft mats may be comfortable, but they’re difficult to hold a pose on — and while you can stand on a too-firm mat forever, you may end up hurting your joints. Beginners, pregnant yogis, and people with sensitive joints should consider thicker mats, which offer more support. Yogis who commute or travel a lot may prefer thinner mats that are easier to roll up and carry.
Experts say: "As an African-American yoga teacher who is also Muslim, Amin is uniquely positioned as a yoga teacher to serve both the community of American Muslims and others. She offers the physical, mental and spiritual qualities of yoga in a way that does not detract from Islamic beliefs. She is an embodied example of the Oneness that is the true reality of life." —Jana Long, Yoga Teacher and Director of Power of One Yoga Center
Over the years, I have tested mats from just about every well-established brand and many from lesser-known up-and-comers. I have watched technologies, materials and designs evolve to meet the needs of an ever growing number of yogis, and I have observed how brands have risen (or failed to rise) to the challenge of a more sustainable future. If you’re ever going to find that perfect mat for you, I can tell you there’s never been a better time than right now.
If you are looking for a supportive, grippy and non-toxic mat, this may be the one for you. The Jade Fusion Yoga Mat has a lot of fantastic qualities. Number one, it’s made mostly from natural rubber, with no PVC, making it eco-friendly and biodegradable - in fact, Jade was the first company in the industry to offer non-toxic mats! It’s thick, incredibly supportive for bones and joints and has amazing grip in both wet and dry conditions. With their ‘Plant a Tree for Every Mat Sold’ initiative, U.S.-base production, and support for programs that bring yoga to those who couldn’t otherwise have access, the company has a strong tradition of responsible industry practices. To read more, visit their page 'What We Care About'.
The way the capitalist economy works makes it very hard for most of us to get the basics we need to stay alive, including housing and healthcare. We are encouraged to become competitive money making bots, and we are denied the time to attend to the things that really matter, like caring for community members, mending the environment or enjoying being alive on this planet. This contradiction makes some of us anxious and/or depressed, and/or leads to addiction and untransformative social unrest. 
Consult your physician and follow all safety instructions before beginning any exercise program or using any supplement or meal replacement product, especially if you have any unique medical conditions or needs. The contents on our website are for informational purposes only, and are not intended to diagnose any medical condition, replace the advice of a healthcare professional, or provide any medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

What to Look for in Yoga Clothes: In the last decade yoga has taken over, and with it a large number of clothing and activewear brands who have found their niche in outfitting yogis of all different styles, shapes, and sizes. This is the reason we have decided to curate the best of those yoga apparel brands on one website. Now you can purchase your favorite strappy Onzie bras in that cool new print and those new Teeki Hot Pants you've had your eye on, all in one place. Both yoga apparel brands have some of the best yoga pants you will ever put on!  From the Vinyasa addict to the slow and steady Hatha practitioner, our yoga clothing and activewear brands will take you through your practice with fashion and function designed specifically for your style of practice. We take our yoga clothing and activewear seriously and don't carry brands that we wouldn't stand behind. Yogis who prefer more yang in their practice will find that supplex fabrics wick sweat away and stay in place as they flow throughout their practice. Hot Yogis who turn up the tapas will want ultra breathable fabrics that dry quickly like Recycled PET and Lyrca. 
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